Top 10 Creative Elevator Ads

By on October 2, 2012

In this post our guest blogger Richard Tucker list down 10 of the most creative elevator ads campaign ever executed.

Sure, elevators get us from place to place, but there’s an even more important use for them that most people don’t realize: advertising.

Think about it. Not only are people trapped in a particular place for a relatively significant period of time, ensuring that they’ll notice the ad, but the elevator itself is designed to make use of creative marketing.

Don’t believe us? Check out these amazing and clever elevator ads from the last few years.

Body World’s “Look Inside”

This awesomely innovative campaign takes advantage of the elevator as a multi-tiered form of advertising. It shows a picture of a man’s throat and chest on the doors with the words “look inside” printed, and inside the door you get to see those words realized with the internal workings of his throat and chest. Clever.

Body's World

Source: www.wikipicks.blogspot.com

Durex’s “Better Shape, Better Sex”

Funny, clever, and risqué, this Durex campaign covers the back wall of the elevator with a design that looks like cracking glass that has women’s high-heeled shoes embedded in it around waist level. On the floor is the image of a discarded Durex condom wrapper. Sexy or disturbing, it’s your call, but it’s certainly attention grabbing.

Durex

Source: www.creativecriminals.com

Oreo’s “Dunk”

One of the better uses of an elevator’s vertical nature, this advertisement features a static cookie in the clear glass elevator shaft and a glass of milk on the doors. When the elevator reaches the top floor, people can see the cookie “dunk.”

Oreo

Source: http://www.toxel.com

Maxwell House’s “Morning Alarm”

Deceptively simple, Maxwell House places a small poster inside the elevator that features a cup of their coffee and the words “wake up” formed from the steam. Even by itself, it’s simple and inviting, but if you look down, you’ll see that the floor of the elevator has broken away and there’s just an empty elevator shaft. “Wake up” indeed.

Maxwell House

Source: www.weburbanist.com

Gillette’s “Hairy Elevator”

Yup, it’s exactly what you’d imagine. Gillette covered the walls of elevators with a thick hairy material to advertise their Mach 3 in Brazil. Gross, but it definitely makes you take notice.

Gillette

Source: www.coloribus.com

Becel’s “Take Action. Love your Heart.”

That simple legend with the Becel logo covered elevator doors, which would seem like a pretty good reminder in and of itself. But when those doors opened, people found themselves staring not at the back of the elevator, but a staircase going up. Who knows if it was effective, but Becel certainly made their point.

Becel

Source: www.adme.ru

Sabina Stobrawe “Divorce Lawyer”

Talk about pulling the rug out. This elevator ad covers the doors with a wedding photo of a happy couple, but when they open, there’s just a stark ad in the back for a divorce lawyer. Ouch.

Divorce Lawyer

Source: www.dreamcss.com

Folliderm “Bald Man”

One of the great horizontal uses of the doors, Folliderm’s ad has a man’s face from the nose up sideways on the doors, with his hair completely on one door. As they open, he “loses” his hair and slowly becomes bald as his image is revealed on the back wall.

Folliderm

Source: www.seesinc.com

Gold’s Gym “Strong Man”

The doors are fairly bare, with only two opposing forearms meeting at the middle. But when the elevator opens, it reveals a muscle man wearing a Gold’s Gym shirt inside who has apparently used those super powerful forearms to let you inside. How kind of him.

Gold's Gym

Source: www.adsoftheworld.com

Swiss Skydive’s “Cityscape”

Depending on your point of view, this one might be awesome or terrifying. Swiss Skydive created a floor advertisement for glass elevators that depicts a cityscape as seen from above. Way, way, way above, as if you were hurtling towards it.

Swiss Skydive

Source: www.brandactivation.nl

These are just a few of the best ones we could find, but there are lot more around that make amazing use of the unique nature of elevators to create ads that surprise and delight.

[box type=”bio”] Richard Tucker has been writing about creative use of space for companies like KONE Spares for nearly 10 years. When he’s not writing, Rich can be found camping, hiking and fishing with his two sons. [/box]

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